1. space-wallpapers:

Saturn looking tiny

    space-wallpapers:

    Saturn looking tiny

    Reblogged from: space-wallpapers
  2. the-wolf-and-moon:

Comet Siding Spring Passes Mars

    the-wolf-and-moon:

    Comet Siding Spring Passes Mars

    Reblogged from: the-wolf-and-moon
  3. toocatsoriginals:

    Last Launch: Discovery, Endeavour, Atlantis

    Photos by Dan Winters from his book

    Reblogged from: cosmicvastness
  4. Reblogged from: falling-off-the-moon
  5. afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).
Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.
From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!
To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

    afro-dominicano:

    An Interacting Colossus

    This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).

    Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.

    From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!

    To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

    Reblogged from: cosmicvastness
  6. space-wallpapers:

The Milkyway over Mt. Rainier

    space-wallpapers:

    The Milkyway over Mt. Rainier

    Reblogged from: space-wallpapers
  7. canadian-space-agency:

NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman aboard the ISS: “The Milky Way steals the show from Sahara sands that make the Earth glow orange.” September 28th 2014.

Credit: Reid Wiseman/NASA

    canadian-space-agency:

    NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman aboard the ISS: “The Milky Way steals the show from Sahara sands that make the Earth glow orange.” September 28th 2014.

    Credit: Reid Wiseman/NASA

    Reblogged from: canadian-space-agency
  8. kjernereaktor:

thedemon-hauntedworld:
The Pinwheel Galaxy (M33) Messier 83 is a barred spiral galaxy approximately 15 million light-years away in the constellation Hydra. It is one of the closest and brightest barred spiral galaxies in the sky, making it visible with binoculars.
Credit: Navaneeth Unnikrishnan

    kjernereaktor:

    thedemon-hauntedworld:

    The Pinwheel Galaxy (M33)
    Messier 83 is a barred spiral galaxy approximately 15 million light-years away in the constellation Hydra. It is one of the closest and brightest barred spiral galaxies in the sky, making it visible with binoculars.

    Credit: Navaneeth Unnikrishnan

    Reblogged from: cosmicvastness
  9. humanoidhistory:

A time-lapsed image of Comet Hale-Bopp at sunset over the Earth’s horizon in April 1997, observed from the Space Shuttle Columbia during STS-83.
(NASA)

    humanoidhistory:

    A time-lapsed image of Comet Hale-Bopp at sunset over the Earth’s horizon in April 1997, observed from the Space Shuttle Columbia during STS-83.

    (NASA)

    Reblogged from: cosmicvastness
  10. just—space:

The Butterfly Nebula from Hubble  : The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth’s night sky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This sharp close-up of the dying star’s nebula was recorded in 2009 by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, and is presented here in reprocessed colors. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is near the center of this view, almost edge-on to the line-of-sight. Molecular hydrogen has been detected in the hot star’s dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation of the Scorpion (Scorpius). via NASA

    just—space:

    The Butterfly Nebula from Hubble  : The bright clusters and nebulae of planet Earth’s night sky are often named for flowers or insects. Though its wingspan covers over 3 light-years, NGC 6302 is no exception. With an estimated surface temperature of about 250,000 degrees C, the dying central star of this particular planetary nebula has become exceptionally hot, shining brightly in ultraviolet light but hidden from direct view by a dense torus of dust. This sharp close-up of the dying star’s nebula was recorded in 2009 by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, and is presented here in reprocessed colors. Cutting across a bright cavity of ionized gas, the dust torus surrounding the central star is near the center of this view, almost edge-on to the line-of-sight. Molecular hydrogen has been detected in the hot star’s dusty cosmic shroud. NGC 6302 lies about 4,000 light-years away in the arachnologically correct constellation of the Scorpion (Scorpius). via NASA

    Reblogged from: just--space
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